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COP21: Paris climate deal is 'best chance to save planet' - 14th December

Climate deal

The climate deal reached in Paris is "the best chance we have to save the one planet we have", US President Barack Obama has said.

The Paris pact aims to curb global warming to less than 2C by the end of the century.

Obama said it could be a "turning point" towards a low-carbon future.

China, the world's biggest polluter, also hailed the deal, as did India. But some campaigners said it did not go far enough to protect the planet.

Nearly 200 countries took part in tense negotiations in the French capital over two weeks, striking the first deal to commit all nations to cut emissions.

The agreement - which is partly legally binding and partly voluntary - will come into being in 2020.

Describing the agreement as "ambitious", President Obama said: "Together, we've shown what's possible when the world stands as one."

"In short, this agreement will mean less of the carbon pollution that threatens our planet and more of the jobs and economic growth driven by low-carbon investments."

However, Mr Obama admitted that the pact was not "perfect".

China's chief negotiator Xie Zhenhua agreed that the Paris plan was not ideal. But he added that "this does not prevent us from marching historical steps forward".

China earlier said rich developed countries needed to offer more financial support to developing countries.

India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi said there were "no winners or losers".

"Climate justice has won and we are all working towards a greener future," 

Giza Gaspar Martins, the chairman of the group representing some of the world's poorest countries, said: "It is the best outcome we could have hoped for, not just for the Least Developed Countries, but for all citizens of the world," he said.

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